Welcome

Welcome brothers and sisters. L.I.N.K (Leadership Initiative and Networking for the Kingdom) is a mission-minded network of CAMPUS alumni and friends who seek to strengthen their Christian witness in the workplace, neighborhood and local church through a lifestyle of service, active mentorship, professional excellence and biblical fidelity.

It is a place young professionals, grad students, and others looking to bring their faith into their everyday life. A place for those looking for encouragement, guidance, and accountability as we seek to reach out to our workplaces and communities, while carrying out the practical duties of life.

Get involved!

Fall 2012 Newsletter

L.I.N.K. 2012 Update

Dear LINK Members,

 

Last year was a pivotal year for LINK. As we entered 2011, many of you were involved in a calling survey in which we contacted over 40 working-age young adults affiliated with an Adventist campus ministry. During our conversations, we asked two main questions: 1) how has your life been since leaving your campus ministry and 2) in your opinion, what is the major challenge for young adults post graduation? We appreciated your candid and sincere responses, and after compiling all the answers, we came to a very eye-opening conclusion.

Newsletter- November 2011

L.I.N.K. Retreat Update

 
Leadership Initiative and Networking for the King Update
 
As young adults graduate and leave institutions of higher learning they become social workers and nurses, engineers and journalists. This past May 2011, more than 40 working-age young adults gathered in Brighton, MI for the 2011 L.I.N.K. retreat. The theme was “Uplift: Uplifting Christ, Uplifting our World”. Drawing inspiration from Christ’s statement in John 12:32 “And I, when I am lifted up from the earth, will draw all people to myself”, L.I.N.K. recognized that now more than ever there is a need for young adults to lift up Christ in their workplaces and communities. Topics including “Finding purpose as a Christian young professional” and “Witnessing in the Workplace” were addressed.
 
Friday evening began with a rain storm outside, but inside the meeting hall the Holy Spirit was actively moving. Throughout the weekend, you could sense a spirit of unity as young adults shared why they had come to the retreat and what they hoped to gain. “I want to better understand God’s purpose for my life”, “I want to network with other Christian young professionals”, “I want to learn to share my faith at work”, were some of the feelings expressed.  We realized that even though we were coming from different parts of the country, as young adults we're all going through very similar experiences, professionally but more importantly spiritually. We were asking many of the same questions, seeking the same type of advice.
 

The Marathon of Life

The Marathon of Life
 
By Erin Gordon
 
Running a marathon is a lot like our Christian walk. Hebrews 12:1-2 says “Therefore we also, since we are surrounded by so great a cloud of witnesses, let us lay aside every weight, and the sin which so easily ensnares us, and let us run with endurance the race that is set before us, looking unto Jesus, the author and finisher of our faith, who for the joy that was set before Him endured the cross, despising the shame, and has sat down at the right hand of the throne of God.”
 
But how are those who have never run a race supposed to understand this verse? Here is my personal application after running the Detroit Half Marathon:
 
Everyone starts the race at a different time. There are so many people that all 20,000+ people cannot cross the starting line at the same time. You may be starting with friends or people whom you know but that’s not always guaranteed. Just like in the Christian walk. Not everyone accepts Christ at the same time or at the same age.
 
When running a race, there is a set distance, but in our Christian walks we all have a different distance to cover and none of us knows what that is until the end comes. We can be comforted, though, in the fact that the race has been “set before us” by God. (Hebrews 12:1) We are not just wandering aimlessly; there is actually a path we are to follow.
 

Ten Healthy Snacks for the Busy Professional

 
 Ten Healthy Snacks for the Busy Professional
 
By: Adrianne Osano
 
As with many important things in life, planning is the key to success. Planning healthy, well-balanced meals and snacks are no different. It is important to have a strategy or “game plan” to keep yourself from raiding the nearest vending machine or the local fast food restaurant when the midmorning hunger pains strike. While a snack can be a great part of your diet, it is important to know that not all snacks are created equal. Therefore, it pays to be mindful about what you are eating. Many health professionals agree “. . . that the best snacks satisfy hunger while helping meet our daily dietary needs, especially for fruits, vegetables, and low-fat dairy”[1]
 
One of the benefits of a healthy snack is that it is a great way for sustaining energy throughout the day. A nutritious snack can be “fuel” for your body and mind by helping you to work productively and avoid the distractions (and embarrassment) that a growling stomach may cause. In addition, a healthy snack is a chaotic schedule's best friend.  For example, having a snack on hand is a wonderful alternative to reaching for that glazed doughnut during your impromptu work meeting.  So, here is a list of ten examples of healthy snacks, which will help to keep you on track during your workday without adding to your waistline!
 

Report: Mission Trip 2011 - Arizona

 
Report: Mission Trip 2011 - Arizona
 
By Kimberly Shin
 
Journeying from the great states of Michigan and Wisconsin, nine excited and eager missionaries went to “not love with words or tongue but with actions and in truth” (1 John 3:18) in the Navajo Nation of Page, Arizona. Their mission: to provide for the immediate needs of the Navajo people and to share Jesus through home building, health, and the Holy Bible. Only a month before was a house burnt down to the ground leaving a family of seven to live in a humble trailer waiting for their new home to be built by these nine missionaries. With very limited resources of water and electricity awaiting them at the community center, the heat index of a hundred with no cloud in sight as they toiled in the day, and living conditions similar to being in a third world country, this mission trip presented many unexpected discomforts. However, encouraged by the Word of God every morning with group devotions, diligent work ethics and group dynamics, and the power of the Holy Spirit, this mission team was able to build the foundation of the house in just 4 days. Word spread throughout the area of the mission work and many natives came to talk, attend our health meetings, and seek help and connection with the Seventh-day Adventist group in town.
 
Each of the missionaries has their own testimony from their mission experience. Below is a sample of some of them:
 
Testimony 1 – Jeevan Nalli

Fitness Today

 
Fitness Today
 
By Sikhululekile Hlatshwayo
 
The past academic year was personally very challenging. From losing my grandmother, to family drama, and finally, professional upheaval – it was a year unprecedented for its emotional tax. In retrospect, I may have even been struggling with depression for the manner in which I dealt with all the stress. But like most readers of this piece, seeking professional help never even crossed my mind. I did not realize how unhappy I was until after my first bike ride.
 
Most of my friends had been getting into the triathlon training thing but not being one to jump on bandwagons easily, I was hesitant to join the club. When one friend, in particular, invited me to join a team that needed a biker for a half ironman distance triathlon though, I acquiesced – mostly because she actually believed that I could do it. She hooked me up with a hybrid bike and thus began my training.
 
I quickly learned that if you’re training towards a goal, you cannot be taking a road trip every weekend because it throws you off. For me, it was too late, as I had committed to so many things before I committed to the race. But even with my sparse training time, it was the time I most looked forward to in the day.
 
On the bike, out in nature, everything seemed right with the world. The fresh air seemed to fill me with life and the physical exertion reminded me that I had been alive all along. Although I was weak and felt worn after just 10 miles on my first ride, I was happier than I had been in months! I have heard that exercise lifts your mood but this was the first time I experienced it in so marked a manner. It was this feeling contrasted to my experience over the previous months that alerted me to how down-in-the-dumps I had been.
 

Disciples in the District: Adventist Teachers in the Public School System

 
Disciples in the District:  Adventist Teachers in the Public School System
 
By Laura Baltazar
 
 
We have all heard the disturbing stories: a high school coach reprimanded for leading his young athletes in prayer; a middle school teacher fired for sharing her religious beliefs with students; a school board sued for displaying the Ten Commandments in an elementary school hallway. From what we read in the headlines, the public school system seems well on its way to becoming a hostile religion-free zone. However, all is not hopeless; religious expression is still constitutionally protected speech. Many people are not aware that students are allowed to openly read scriptures, pray, and participate in religious clubs before, during, and after school hours on school grounds. Unfortunately, when it comes to teachers, being a Christian, and more specifically, a Seventh- day Adventist, can be a major liability.
 
One of the beautiful things about living in the United States right now is the oft-misunderstood “separation of church and state” clause in the Bill of Rights. Although this phrase does not actually occur anywhere in the Constitution, it refers to the beginning of the First Amendment, which states,
               
                “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof…”1
 

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